Childhood Memories

November 27, 2020

Childhood Memories

There is something uniquely personal about primitive stick chairs. They have an individuality and character about them, that more sophisticated furniture often doesn't share.
 
Maybe it’s their elemental quality, the unpretentious “form and function” aesthetic, along with interesting surface textures and patination, that bear witness to their working lives and individual histories.
 
Fashioned from indigenous timbers and made by vernacular craftsmen, they were built for regular use, so they were solid, reliable, and functional. These features, along with their bold simplicity and appealing economic lines, are the qualities we continue to celebrate.
 
Examples of children’s primitive stick-back chairs are unusual and the memorable ones tend to echo the form and character of contemporary full-grown “adult” chairs, as in this case.
 
The present example is a rare survivor.  A miniature version of a classic full-sized West-Country model, with a plain crest rail and the shaped flat section arms, through which the outside spindles are socketed on both sides. Originally made with four legs, at some time in its early life it was converted to a three-legged model, so it could stand safely on uneven surfaces.

Gloriously timeworn after nearly 250 years, its whimsical wonky character lives on, ready to inspire joyful memories for yet another family.





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